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Girl goes Bald from Pulling her Own Hair (Trichotillomania)

Why some people want to keep pulling their hair?

A girl suffering from Trichotillomania created a 6 year montage of selfies. Her Youtube video has been viewed for over 5 million times. Rebecca Brown a 21-year-old from Essex took a photo of herself every day for six years straight to show the effects of trichotillomania in her life. Included in her video are her stages of depression and how she almost turned suicidal. Youtube has been her coping tool since the year 2000. She has had problems with eye contact and is more comfortable talking through the camera. She had problems dealing with people’s reactions and expressions and she deemed it best to just express herself through the lens of a camera. Whenever she feels stressed or anxious, she would unconsciously reach her hair and pull it out.
Girl goes Bald from Pulling her Own Hair (Trichotillomania)
 
Is there a remedy to this behavior? 
 
Trichotillomania is not something one could just easily stop doing. It would require therapy and medication at some point. It could also have something to do with depression and anxiety. Hair pulling could be an unconscious action which could also be a form of stress relief for those who have this disorder. 
 
Rebecca Brown is now growing her hair back but she wishes to continue sharing her story to those who are going through the same road she went through. By the looks of all her videos now, no one would even think that she has had depression because in those videos it shows the real Rebecca, a charming person, bright, creative and a cheerful fighter.
 
 
 
Trichotillomania is the compulsive urge to pull out (and in some cases, eat) one's own hair leading to noticeable hair loss, distress, and social or functional impairment. It appears in the DSM-V chapter on obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and is often chronic and difficult to treat. Trichotillomania may be present in infants, but the peak age of onset is 9 to 13. It may be triggered by depression or stress. Owing to social implications the disorder is often unreported and it is difficult to accurately predict its prevalence; the lifetime prevalence is estimated to be between 0.6% (overall) and may be as high as 1.5% (in males) to 3.4% (in females). Common areas for hair to be pulled out are the scalp, eyelashes, eyebrows, legs, arms, hands, nose and the public areas.” – Wikipedia

by Abie Remo
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